diasporicroots

haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”

* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.

smithsonian

smithsonian:

Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of during his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria: he focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors. 

Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here.

I love these!

cartoonpolitics
cartoonpolitics:

A man shot and killed an unidentified armed intruder who was trying to break into his house through a window at 5.30am. It turned out the home-invader was part of a local SWAT team with a ‘no knock’ warrant to search for drugs. There were no drugs. The homeowner now faces charges including 1 count of capital murder and 3 of attempted capital murder. The DA will seek the death penalty .. (story here)

What?

cartoonpolitics:

A man shot and killed an unidentified armed intruder who was trying to break into his house through a window at 5.30am. It turned out the home-invader was part of a local SWAT team with a ‘no knock’ warrant to search for drugs. There were no drugs. The homeowner now faces charges including 1 count of capital murder and 3 of attempted capital murder. The DA will seek the death penalty .. (story here)

What?

archaicwonder

archaicwonder:

'Bee and Stag' Tetradrachm from Ephesos, Ionia, c. 390-325 BC, by the magistrate Phanagores

From almost the very beginning of the history of coinage the Greeks made coins depicting animals symbolic of their city. The the bee was one of the first symbolic animals ever used. The obverse of this coin shows a lovely  bee with straight wings and the inscription for Ephesus, E-Φ,  The reverse shows the forepart of a stag to the right, its head turned back with a palm tree and the inscription of the magistrate who issued the coin, ΦΑΝΑΓΟΡΗΣ.

Ephesos (Ephesus) used the bee on its coins since it was a producer of honey, so the bee advertised their most famous product. The bee was also mythologically connected to Ephesus because, according to Philostratos, the colonizing Athenians were led to Ephesus and Ionia by the Muses who took the form of bees.

The city was also the location of the famous Temple of Artemis. Her priestesses were called ‘melissai” or “honey bees” of the goddess. The stag, like the one used on this coin is also an attribute of Artemis, the goddess of the hunt. This animal was regarded as sacred to her and stag figures were said to have flanked the cult statue of Artemis in her  temple at Ephesus. The palm tree on the obverse alludes to Artemis’ birthplace, the island of Delos, where the goddess Leto gave birth to Artemis and her twin brother Apollo underneath a palm tree. This coin represents its city of origin well.

Ephesus was an ancient Greek city on the coast of Ionia, three kilometers southwest of present-day Selçuk in Izmir Province, Turkey. It was built in the 10th century BC on the site of the former Arzawan capital by Attic and Ionian Greek colonists.

Beautiful!

mypubliclands

mypubliclands:

BLM Colorado Uses “Critter Cams” for Wildlife Monitoring

Biologists at the Royal Gorge Field Office in Colorado utilize guzzlers and other water collection systems to manage grazing and increase water access to wildlife. Still cameras have been placed at guzzlers along the front range of the Rocky Mountains to monitor use and activity. 

Cameras provide a dimension of monitoring that give biologists an invaluable amount of information as to the frequency of use and by what species. Beyond the scientific data collected by the critter cameras, magnificent, candid photographs of coyotes, bobcats and other creatures are captured.